Frequently Asked Questions

The SewerPros are dedicated to providing recommended best practses for sewer and drain cleaning and inspections.
Our FAQs help to save you time, money, and hassle.

Q
Can I use an over the counter drain cleaner?
A
Over the counter drain cleaners can work in certain situations, but are potentially more harmful to you, the environment, and your sewer line than they are to the clog. If you should decide to try an over the counter drain cleaner, make sure you use hand and eye protection and never try to plunge a sink or toilet after pouring chemicals as they can splash causing serious injury. Check Out Our Drain Cleaning Services >>
Q
What can be done to prevent backups?
A
There are several things you should do to help prevent backups: Do not flush paper towels, feminine products, ‘flushable’ wipes or plastics down the toilet. Limit the use of the garbage disposal and always run water for several minutes after use. Use screens on sink and tub drains to prevent hair and other items from falling into the drain. Do not pour grease or oil down the drain. If your home was built prior to the mid-1970s you should have a qualified contractor cable your sewer line annually to clean out tree roots and keep your sewer line open and clear. Learn More About Our Sewer Cleaning Service >>
Q
If my line is presently backed up, do I need a Camera Inspection?
A
Roots in PVCThe answer is no. If your sewer is currently backed up you should have it cleaned to remove the blockage. If your sewer backs up regularly, you may want to consider a camera inspection to determine if the problem is more severe than a standard blockage. Click On The Photo To View Our Sewer Inspection Gallery

Q
If I’m buying a home, what can the Sewer Inspection tell me?
A
A sewer inspection will show the condition of the main sewer line with a lighted video camera. The camera will allow us to see if any major issues exist like cracks, offsets in joints, pipe deflection, and sags in the line. What we commonly find are tree roots that have grown into the line through unsealed connections which need to be cleaned out annually to help prevent backups. Learn More About Our Sewer Inspection Service >>
Q
How can using The SewerPros save me money?
A
Before purchasing a house, a sewer inspection may expose defects not known by the sellers that could lead to a costly repair. By inspecting the main sewer line before you buy the home, you can consider the cost of the repair and possibly negotiate with the seller, potentially saving you thousands of dollars. Since we do not make repairs to the sewer line, you will get an honest opinion on the condition of your sewer line without being sold an expensive repair that may not be necessary. Schedule A Service With The SewerPros Today >>
Q
Can a Sewer Inspection be performed during my building inspection?
A
Yes. For your convenience we regularly work with real estate agents and home inspectors to schedule the sewer inspection at the same time as your building inspection. Ask your real estate agent or home inspector for a sewer camera inspection. Learn More About Our Sewer Inspection Service >>
Q
If I have roots in my line, do I need a repair?
A
Roots in PVCNot necessarily. Our technician will explain the severity of root intrusion as your line is being inspected. Roots are very common in older Clay sewer lines and may just need to be cleaned annually to prevent backups. If your sewer line is a sealed line (i.e. Cast Iron or PVC) then repairs may be required as roots do not typically enter these lines. Click On The Photo To View Our Sewer Inspection Gallery
Q
What causes a backup?
A
Roots, broken pipe, obstructions, ‘flushable’ wipes and grease buildup are the most common problems. Learn More About Our Drain Cleaning Service >>
Q
Will inserting the camera into my sewer line give me any further damage?
A
No. The camera will not harm the pipe. Learn More About Our Sewer Inspection Service >>
Q
What is Cast Iron?
A
Cast Iron is a metal pipe that has been manufactured and used in The United States since the early 1800s. A good quality Cast Iron pipe, installed under ideal conditions, has a life expectancy of about 50-100 years. As Cast Iron ages it begins to corrode and deteriorate. This deterioration is very slow but exponential and does affect the structural integrity of the pipe eventually requiring repair or replacement. In some cases, the beginning signs of deterioration will be evident through small cracks or breaks in the pipe. Tree roots growing into the Cast Iron is also a sign that the pipe has deteriorated to the point that a repair will likely be needed. In more severe cases, entire sections of the pipe may be missing or the pipe may have completely collapsed. Cast Iron was used extensively in single family homes until the late 1960s to the mid 1970s when plastic became the material of choice.
Q
What is PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride)?
A
PVC is a plastic material that became popular in the 1960s as a cheaper and easier to install alternative to Cast Iron. PVC is light weight and very durable so it became the main material used in sewer line applications by the early 1970s. Properly installed, PVC has a life expecancy of 100+ years. The common issues we see with improperly installed PVC relate to poorly glued connections that have separated or improperly backfilled lines that have been crushed.
Q
What is ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene)?
A
ABS is very similar to PVC in terms of cost and ease of installation, but is considered to be slightly less durable. ABS is widely used in some areas of the country but is not nearly as prevalant as PVC. The common issues we see with improperly installed ABS relate to poorly glued connections that have seperated or improperly backfilled lines that have been crushed.
Q
What is Clay?
A
Clay is one of the most ancient piping materials, with the earliest known example coming from Babylonia. Clay pipe was laid in 2, 3 and 4 foot lengths for most residential applications. There is an expanded “bell” hub at one end. The regular end of a pipe fits snugly into the bell end of the next pipe, making a joint. These joints were typically packed with a mortar type material creating a seal. The Clay piping is very strong but like glass, it will crack or break under pressure. The most common issues we find in Clay are tree root intrusion and cracked or broken sections of pipe.
Q
What is cabling?
A
Cabling is the industry term for cleaning the sewer line. The use of a long mechanically driven “cable” is used to clean the sewer line so it eventually became known as cabling. Learn More About Our Sewer Cleaning Service >>

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They were able to get to my home within 2 hours. Kyle was the service man and did a great job. He explained everything he was doing, worked quickly, and also gave great advice on how to prevent any further kitchen sink clogs. Great company! Great staff! Would highly recommend in the future.

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Fast, friendly and reasonably priced. Rick and his helper were great. Highly recommend.

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